choti-choti baatein

and suddenly I became a spectacle.
bits and pieces from a student abroad in india.

my other blog (that's on semi-hiatus but not really): ayoungmachine
The view from the top. We hiked from the golden blob!

The view from the top. We hiked from the golden blob!

Hiking upside inside the fort.

Hiking upside inside the fort.

What’s up, I learned how to make Indian chai today and made it for all my classmates. Surprisingly, it didn’t suck. 

It’s the little things in life. 

An amazing little room inside the Fort. I wish this were bigger and could fit more than ten or so people, because I would totally get married in it.

Inside the Sheesh Mahal. Thousands of mirrors adorn this palace. Also check out that bed and hookah. I would totally hang out here.

A painting on the ceiling above one of the side gates to the Sheesh Mahal.

A painting on the ceiling above one of the side gates to the Sheesh Mahal.

The gate to the Sheesh Mahal (mirror palace) and its courtyard.

The gate to the Sheesh Mahal (mirror palace) and its courtyard.

Elephant rides from the bottom of the fort up to the entrance. I only edited this one slightly so that the colours weren’t so dull.

Elephant rides from the bottom of the fort up to the entrance. I only edited this one slightly so that the colours weren’t so dull.

The Amer Fort, just outside of the old city in Jaipur.

This is a photo I took while we were touring the Jaipur Foot. Jaipur Foot is the name of the organization as well as the device it provides: arguably the best prosthetic limbs available worldwide. The Jaipur Foot was initially developed to replace preexisting prosthetics that simply were not viable for Indian lifestyles. Now available in over 25 countries, Jaipur Foot has provided feet, knees, limbs, and polio boots to over 1.2 million people. The picture above shows the cart-bike devices given to individuals who have severe disabilities that wouldn’t be able to benefit from a prosthetic or to those with advanced polio. The best part of this organization is that they serve any patient that walks through their doors completely free of charge, regardless of who you are or where you came from. They even have a small hostel on site available to those who need it. The factory/clinic also offers employment options to those it has served. It was so heartwarming to tour such an incredibly efficient organization and meet individuals using these prosthetics. You can’t even tell they’re using them, really, which is stunning. The current director informed us that they’re in the process of developing a hand. I’m excited to see that go live. I love seeing Indians roaming about town in these carts. This is an organization that knows what it’s doing and where it’s going. I’m always impressed by an organization that provides amazing services to individuals, especially ones like these that serve all over the world. Disabilities of any sort affect everyone involved in that person’s life, so really, the number of beneficiaries is far above 1.2 million - include the family, the friends, the coworkers, the acquaintances of those who no longer have to let their disability define them. I would recommend volunteering with this organization abroad to those interested in public health. 

This is a photo I took while we were touring the Jaipur Foot. Jaipur Foot is the name of the organization as well as the device it provides: arguably the best prosthetic limbs available worldwide. The Jaipur Foot was initially developed to replace preexisting prosthetics that simply were not viable for Indian lifestyles. Now available in over 25 countries, Jaipur Foot has provided feet, knees, limbs, and polio boots to over 1.2 million people. The picture above shows the cart-bike devices given to individuals who have severe disabilities that wouldn’t be able to benefit from a prosthetic or to those with advanced polio. The best part of this organization is that they serve any patient that walks through their doors completely free of charge, regardless of who you are or where you came from. They even have a small hostel on site available to those who need it. The factory/clinic also offers employment options to those it has served. 

It was so heartwarming to tour such an incredibly efficient organization and meet individuals using these prosthetics. You can’t even tell they’re using them, really, which is stunning. The current director informed us that they’re in the process of developing a hand. I’m excited to see that go live.

I love seeing Indians roaming about town in these carts. This is an organization that knows what it’s doing and where it’s going. I’m always impressed by an organization that provides amazing services to individuals, especially ones like these that serve all over the world. Disabilities of any sort affect everyone involved in that person’s life, so really, the number of beneficiaries is far above 1.2 million - include the family, the friends, the coworkers, the acquaintances of those who no longer have to let their disability define them. I would recommend volunteering with this organization abroad to those interested in public health.